Shock absorption

The body’s shock absorption consists of three parts.

The passive shock absorption consisting of ligament joints, major connective tissue structures like the neckband as well as other tendons and ligaments.

The active shock absorption is operated by muscle power.

The third shock absorption is the linking structure of the connective tissue that connects muscles throughout the body.

Thanks to the linked connective tissues, we can absorb a shock throughout the body. A blow to the foot from a stone can thus provide an impact at the end of that connective chain, right up to the base of the skull.

This becomes evident in whiplash injury, where trauma occurs primarily in the end of the whiplash movement where sensitive neck muscles and connective tissue structures are torn apart, responding with cramps that the body does not come out of, and a chronic inflammation begins.

The same thing goes when slipping on a patch of ice, where one of the shoulders can get the final strain after we sprawled forward a few steps, although the grip was lost under the foot.

This feature is important to lessen the impact and trauma and to distribute them through the body. It is clear that we can withstand more external influence if we are soft with full mobility in the connective tissue and muscles. A rigid body is torn apart easier.

Problems linked to Fascia

Injuries

One can distinguish between damage caused by wear and strain and injuries that come from external trauma or accidents. An uncertain cause on the scale is the accidents that occur due to a body having reduced function over a longer period and that is damaged as a result of that.

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Growing interest in Fascia treatment: “Fascia problems are often under diagnosed”

David Lesondak is a structural integrator and a myofascial specialist who has been working for many years trying to explain what fascia is, as well as the benefits you get from treating different problems with fascia treatment. In an interview at the Fascia Research Congress in Berlin 2018, he describes the basics of what fascia is and what challenges it is facing in the strive for recognition in the medical field.

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Hyper-extension

In places where the body has become stiff and numb the nervous system cannot signal the situation as quickly as it should so that we can control our movements.

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Straining – Lumbago

Lumbago follows the same pattern as hyper-extension. We usually have built up tension and stiffness that eventually impair the reaction of the nerves and muscles of the rigid area.

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Problems linked to Fascia

Fascia is a system of flexible connective tissue encapsulating everything in the body. If the system is running smoothly, all is fine, but when some parts become stiff, tense or inflamed, there will be consequences.

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What causes back pain?

New research shows that low back pain is caused by inflammation in the Fascia. But why are we getting low back pain and what happens in our body when we get back pain?

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Scar tissue

As the body builds scar tissue after damage to the skin, scar tissue build up in the Fascia inside the body when it is damaged. Therefore, we can get a chronic reduction in movement inside after an operation in which the Fascia is sewn together.

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Shock absorption

Thanks to the linked connective tissues, we can absorb a shock throughout the body. A blow to the foot from a stone can thus provide an impact at the end of that connective chain, right up to the base of the skull.

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Hypermobility

Hypermobile people build up enormous tension in their muscles that give painful tension in the joint, and they often get nerves pinched.

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