Impaired flow and mobility

Fascia that has thickened will become stiff and will get impaired flow and gliding ability. This can causes a lot of symptoms. The body feels heavy and sluggish, it causes pain, you get edema, have poor balance and so on. The flow in the fascia will be impaired and gets slower. Then the collagen fibers come closer and can “stick together”. Nerve receptors are subjected to higher pressure  and hence, signal pain, while other signals will be impeded due to the pressure. Muscles can go into convulsions as they constantly get a signal to contract. Inflammation may occur when transport and communication throughout the tissue are disturbed and the immune system tries to solve the problem. A tight connective tissue chain can distort the skeleton so that the balance is disturbed and joints wear.

The entire locomotion system is affected by poor coordination and endurance as a result. The causes may be many, overload, damage by external trauma, inflammation due to lifestyle, poor diet, nutritional deficiencies, anxiety, depression or other issues.

It is clear that our bodies need motion to maintain optimal metabolism and circulation to the tissues. If we stop moving the flow will decrease and the fascia sticks together. It is a good way to pandiculate after rest or sedentary. Yawning with a deep inhalation and then a slow exhalation also stretch the lungs. If it hurts and the movement is obtuse, however, it is easy to avoid to move which instead leads to stagnation in the flow.

Studies have shown that after a stroke in which the central nervous system is damaged, the tissues slow down. It does not happen immediately, but as body parts affected by the stroke are not consciously moved, muscles enter a spastic state. Passively getting help to move the body can help a lot and treatment with soft vibrations may help the spasm to relax.

Hyaluronan, which is found in the ground substance of the fascia, binds a lot of water and it can quickly change viscosity (‘thickness’ of a liquid) and is therefore an important component to control the flow. It has many functions in the body and is one of the most important components of the fascia (if one can say that something is more important than the other since everything isa whole). Read more about hyaluronan on the Fascia Anatomy page.

Thus it is important to regularly maintain the entire locomotion system, both training strength, mobility and flexibility. Muscles must be strong to sustain, but they also have to be able to stretch and follow a movement.

Psychological aspects also affect our patterns of movement. A person who is nervous and tense keeps their movements tight and builds up tension. The person who gesticulates and flaps is more mobile and relaxed.

Problems linked to Fascia

Injuries

One can distinguish between damage caused by wear and strain and injuries that come from external trauma or accidents. An uncertain cause on the scale is the accidents that occur due to a body having reduced function over a longer period and that is damaged as a result of that.

Read more

Scar tissue

As the body builds scar tissue after damage to the skin, scar tissue build up in the Fascia inside the body when it is damaged. Therefore, we can get a chronic reduction in movement inside after an operation in which the Fascia is sewn together.

Read more

Hypermobility

Hypermobile people build up enormous tension in their muscles that give painful tension in the joint, and they often get nerves pinched.

Read more

Straining – Lumbago

Lumbago follows the same pattern as hyper-extension. We usually have built up tension and stiffness that eventually impair the reaction of the nerves and muscles of the rigid area.

Read more

Shock absorption

Thanks to the linked connective tissues, we can absorb a shock throughout the body. A blow to the foot from a stone can thus provide an impact at the end of that connective chain, right up to the base of the skull.

Read more

What causes back pain?

New research shows that low back pain is caused by inflammation in the Fascia. But why are we getting low back pain and what happens in our body when we get back pain?

Read more

Problems linked to Fascia

Fascia is a system of flexible connective tissue encapsulating everything in the body. If the system is running smoothly, all is fine, but when some parts become stiff, tense or inflamed, there will be consequences.

Read more

Hyper-extension

In places where the body has become stiff and numb the nervous system cannot signal the situation as quickly as it should so that we can control our movements.

Read more

Growing interest in Fascia treatment: “Fascia problems are often under diagnosed”

David Lesondak is a structural integrator and a myofascial specialist who has been working for many years trying to explain what fascia is, as well as the benefits you get from treating different problems with fascia treatment. In an interview at the Fascia Research Congress in Berlin 2018, he describes the basics of what fascia is and what challenges it is facing in the strive for recognition in the medical field.

Read more