Scar tissue

As the body builds scar tissue after damage to the skin, scar tissue build up in the Fascia inside the body when it is damaged. Therefore, we can get a chronic reduction in movement inside after an operation in which the Fascia is sewn together. It will not be the same hard and jagged scar tissue when the Fascia can heal itself together without stitches.

Scarring and thickening also occur naturally in the overworked parts. As described in the Fascia’s basic composition, it can build up quickly to withstand high stress.

Veterinary Dr. Vibeke Sødring Elbrønd described how she was able to find scarring and thickening in the parts of dissected horses which she already knew had injuries and lameness. The body is built on where it is overloaded, even with bone tissue where the bone is overloaded, so-called upper leg, or calcification. The same thing goes for human tissue.

People who overload a body part for a long period of time will be stiffer and will have thickened connective tissue in the most strained parts. This can be difficult to treat and remove in a short time. Especially if the body continues to be subjected to the load. But, if the spasms stop and mobility increase the Fascia will usually follow slowly and soften.

A thickened Fascia will naturally lose elasticity and mobility. The area will become more difficult to treat and the results can be slower. When thickened, connective tissue treatment may have to be repeated several times over a longer period so that the tissue gets a chance to recover.

Problems linked to Fascia

Straining – Lumbago

Lumbago follows the same pattern as hyper-extension. We usually have built up tension and stiffness that eventually impair the reaction of the nerves and muscles of the rigid area.

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Hyper-extension

In places where the body has become stiff and numb the nervous system cannot signal the situation as quickly as it should so that we can control our movements.

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Growing interest in Fascia treatment: “Fascia problems are often under diagnosed”

David Lesondak is a structural integrator and a myofascial specialist who has been working for many years trying to explain what fascia is, as well as the benefits you get from treating different problems with fascia treatment. In an interview at the Fascia Research Congress in Berlin 2018, he describes the basics of what fascia is and what challenges it is facing in the strive for recognition in the medical field.

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Scar tissue

As the body builds scar tissue after damage to the skin, scar tissue build up in the Fascia inside the body when it is damaged. Therefore, we can get a chronic reduction in movement inside after an operation in which the Fascia is sewn together.

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Hypermobility

Hypermobile people build up enormous tension in their muscles that give painful tension in the joint, and they often get nerves pinched.

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Injuries

One can distinguish between damage caused by wear and strain and injuries that come from external trauma or accidents. An uncertain cause on the scale is the accidents that occur due to a body having reduced function over a longer period and that is damaged as a result of that.

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What causes back pain?

New research shows that low back pain is caused by inflammation in the Fascia. But why are we getting low back pain and what happens in our body when we get back pain?

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Problems linked to Fascia

Fascia is a system of flexible connective tissue encapsulating everything in the body. If the system is running smoothly, all is fine, but when some parts become stiff, tense or inflamed, there will be consequences.

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Shock absorption

Thanks to the linked connective tissues, we can absorb a shock throughout the body. A blow to the foot from a stone can thus provide an impact at the end of that connective chain, right up to the base of the skull.

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